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Why Windows Vista will suck March 2, 2006

Posted by rjdohnert in Software reviews.
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I just got done reading an opinion peice by resident Linux zealot Steven J Vaughn-Nichols. After reading the article I have come to the conclusion that this self professed Operating System expert is just that, self professed.

” First, let me say, I’ve been running Vista myself for quite some time. Next to me at this very moment is a Gateway 835GM. Under the hood, it has an Intel Pentium D 2.8GHz dual-core processor, an Intel 945G chipset, 1GB DDR2 (double data rate) DRAM, a 250GB SATA hard drive, and built-in Intel GMA (graphics media accelerator) 950 graphics. That’s a fairly powerful machine. Which is a good thing, because it’s the only PC in my office of 20 PCs that’s got enough oomph to run the Windows Vista February CTP (Community Technology Preview) build 5308 without driving me into fits of rage.”

I run it on a lower powered system and I have yet to be driven into fits of rage. Actually doing my experiments I have found you can actually run it on much lower powered systems and not be driven into fits of rage

” Mind you, it’s not enough machine for Vista. I could run any Linux with all the bells and whistles on it without a problem. But, even though this system meets Intel’s recommendations for a Vista-capable Intel Professional Business Platform, it still doesn’t have the graphics horsepower needed to carry off Vista’s much ballyhooed three-dimensional Aero Glass interface.”

Your a Linux guy, I didnt expect any less. But as for Aero Glass why would you want to run it on a laptop, so you will have the same battery time that the new Mac Book Pros have. Seriously though if you bothered to read the release notes for the CTP you would see that MS says Glass performance on mobile units would be lacking. Expect it to be fixed.

” My point is, though, that while I write a lot about Linux, and I prefer it, my real specialty is that I know operating systems of all types and sorts, including Vista. “

Lets see you run Linux-Watch.com, you are a regular contributor to DesktopLinux.com and and you are Ziff Davis’s Linux and Open Source commentator. I think its more bias than anything else. Anyone who takes you seriously as an “expert” should have their head examined. Do you try to build your credibility by saying “Oh yes, while I write about and evangalize Linux, I really do know a lot about Windows. ” If you did truly run Windows Vista seriously, you would have known the points you brought up here were completely and utterly false

“So when I say Vista sucks, well, I know what I’m talking about.”

No, you dont.

“The truth is that very, very few people are going to be upgrading their existing systems to Vista. To make it work well, you’re really going to need a new computer. If you didn’t buy your PC in 2006, I wouldn’t even try to run Vista on it.”

I run it on a system from 2001 with no problem. And yes, I do intend to upgrade my existing systems to Windows Vista. I have run Windows Vista on a variety of systems even an 866mhz PC and aa 900mhz PC and while I wouldnt use them to do anything extremely intensive for writing documents and doing e-mail and web browsing they are fine. Oh yeah, what about Glass? Well if many people are like most people I know of they really wont care. How many non-technical users do you know of that change their default Windows XP theme. Very few. How many corporate environments do you know of that actually allow desktop themes and such to be altered? Not many. Most corporate settings I have seen, they either use the default Luna theme if they run Windows XP or they use the classic Windows 2000 looks. The lack of glass on machines that cant run glass will be of little to no concern to them. I have never seen a corporate environment where they allow the Neowin hacked UXTheme.dll to be installed.

“Well, yes, this is certainly what Microsoft would have to do to make it truly secure. I’ve say that myself. Unfortunately, while Microsoft has worked hard on improving Vista’s security, it’s still pretty much the same old rickety kernel underneath it.”

Its Windows Server 2003 at the core. I would hardly call that rickety. Lets see Windows Server 2003 has only had 81 vulnerabilities while Red Hat Enterprise 4 has had 153 and it was released an entire year after Windows Server 2003. I think you need to redefine rickety.

” Need proof? In January, Microsoft shipped the first security patch for Vista. It was for the WMF (Windows Metafile) hole. You know, the one, that my >security guru friend Larry Seltzer called, “one of those careless things Microsoft did years ago with little or no consideration for the security consequences.””

So now you are gonna knitpick a CTP thats not even supposed to be used in a production environment. Wouldnt you have been bitching if Microsoft had not released a patch. Be sure that it will be fixed in the RTM release. Also, the WMF flaw was not a kernel flaw and it actually wasnt a flaw. While yes, legacy code exists in Windows it exists in many OS’es. Linux Im sure has legacy code from the kernel 2.2 days and I know OS X contains legacy code from NeXTStep.

” What they don’t mention is that Linux and Mac OS X have both done that kind of thing well for years. They also don’t mention that for an application to actually get the most from these improvements, it will need to be rewritten. So, if you want to get the most from Vista, be sure to set some money aside for new applications as well as a new PC. You’ll need it.”

That statement right there shows me you know noting about software development. BTW, Im running Microsoft Office 2003 and Lotus Notes on Windows Vista with no performance hit in fact they seem a little speedier, as an experiment to see how backwards compatibility is with Windows Vista I installed WordPerfect 5 for DOS and Lotus 1-2-3 for DOS and they worked. They didnt need to be rewritten. In fact in one presentation they actually ran VisiCalc and QBasic

” You see, with SuperFetch you can a USB 2.0-based flash drive as a fetch buffer between your RAM and your hard disk. Let me spell that out for you. Vista will put part of your running application on a device that can be kicked off, knocked out, or that your dog can carry away as a chew toy. Do you see the problem here? Me too!”

Also note, that a USB memory stick can be knocked out of a Linux desktop as easily as a Windows or Mac desktop. The problem I see here is that you dont think Microsofts engineers even thought of that. But lets take a look at what happens should the superfetch device be knocked out. Dog carries it off, Performance returns to what it was before the device was inserted. Knocked or kicked out, same thing performance returns to what it was.

“Excuse me, but that’s not because Microsoft is being innovative. It’s because they are still not shipping CableCard cards for PCs. Come the day they finally ship — and I’m betting the ATI OCCUR makes it out first — I suspect MythTV and the other open-source PVR (personal video recorder) projects will be right there.”

Nope they wont. It will take them (MythTV Developers) quite a bit longer. Microsoft is also building in support for IPv6. Are you now going to say its not innovative or stupid to include the support because IPv6 is not mainstream yet?

” The folks from ExtremeTech also like the fact that Vista will have many more built-in applications. Isn’t this why Microsoft got into trouble with the Department of Justice a while back? Isn’t this the kind of thing that has both South Korea and the European Union raking them over the coals? Why, yes. Yes, it is.”

Excuse me if I dont see Photo management software and a calendering software as a huge market. Picasa2 works fine on Windows Vista by the way as does Sunbird, if they ever get done with it, and a slew of other applications work fine on Windows Vista. Windows Vista apps are really non obtrusive in my opinion should I decide to use an alternative. Of course you would know that if you used the system

“Be that as it may, as I sit here looking at my SUSE 10 Linux desktop, I can’t help but notice that I have, for free, every software application I could ever want. Advantage: Linux.”

You can also have any app you want for Windows for free, as most OSS software has a Windows version available for it. And yes, they run on Windows Vista.

When you read this article just realize it comes from a biased Linux zealot that even if Microsoft was to release an OS that was totally bulletproof he would attempt to tear it down. Im actually using Windows Vista and I can tell you right now it will be well worth it when released and its supposedly not going to be expensive. My question is, Was Steve J. Vaughn Nichols taking Benedryl when he wrote this article or something much stronger?

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Comments»

1. shooby - March 2, 2006

get a clue.

2. Anonymous - March 2, 2006

your right, linux people need to get a clue

3. Anonymous - March 2, 2006

You’re an idiot. That was one of the best articles I have ever read. Microsoft is doomed

4. Anonymous - March 3, 2006

That article was very weak. I completely disagree with him and I agree with Mr. Dohnert. If the kernel was based on the XP SP2 kernel I would say Microsoft will have problems. But on the knowledge that its based on the Windows Server 2003 kernel, I think the SJVN is very ill informed.

5. Anonymous - March 9, 2006

I still doubt it will be any better than Mac OS X. I’ve stopped using windows since ’98, and while it seems to be getting better, I’ll have to agree with SJVN that it is not getting better fast enough to compete with the geek power of linux and the efficiency of Mac OS X. This is still windows, nothing innovative like Croquet.

6. Anonymous - March 9, 2006

Dude, you’re replying to a biased opinion replying to a biased opinion in the first place. šŸ™‚
That being said, there are some weakpoints in your reasoning also:

I run it on a lower powered system and I have yet to be driven into fits of rage. Actually doing my experiments I have found you can actually run it on much lower powered systems and not be driven into fits of rage

I’m sure vista can be run on a reasonably low-powered system, which is reasonably inside microsoft’s target group. I’ll stretch it a bit and say were talking about 500mhz and up. But, linux can run productively on even older hardware which means 2 things:
1)You can use it on a really old machine.
2)It will work smoother on your 500mhz machine than vista for e-mail , web browsing as you say.

Also note, that a USB memory stick can be knocked out of a Linux desktop as easily as a Windows or Mac desktop. The problem I see here is that you dont think Microsofts engineers even thought of that. But lets take a look at what happens should the superfetch device be knocked out. Dog carries it off, Performance returns to what it was before the device was inserted. Knocked or kicked out, same thing performance returns to what it was.

Nobody has commented on the security issues of this. Is the data gonna be sended encrypted to the usb key? Wouldn’t that rule out the performance gained? That being said, I’m looking forward at seeing this technology. I want to see how MS will dodge the limited write cycles a flash card has. It sounds great for the average desktop user and if it really does deliver a performance increase, I’ll bet you we will see a linux version.

Its Windows Server 2003 at the core. I would hardly call that rickety. Lets see Windows Server 2003 has only had 81 vulnerabilities while Red Hat Enterprise 4 has had 153 and it was released an entire year after Windows Server 2003. I think you need to redefine rickety.

This is a weak way of comparing security. You have to get in the whole: where exactly is the vulnerability, what path of vulnerabilities would you need to follow to achieve your goal (say, root the machine). Also considering that windows is the primary target for malware inc, you know any vulnerability in windows is gonna be used against it. The point being: we could discuss all night about probable ways of attacking and inherit security, percentage of windows machines on the net and other stuff, but at the end of the day, the facts are that linux machines are statistically invulnerable compared to windows machines. Not invulnerable, but if you compare the chance of you being owned at this time on te net, running linux or OSX makes you considerably safer…

Anyway, I’m from WSNC myself, keep up the good work, but don’t feed the trolls, on either side. šŸ˜‰

Slasdot response here:
http://it.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=179662&threshold=-1&commentsort=0&mode=thread&pid=14880890

7. Anonymous - March 9, 2006

If the kernel was based on the XP SP2 kernel I would say Microsoft will have problems. But on the knowledge that its based on the Windows Server 2003 kernel, I think the SJVN is very ill informed.

That sounds familiar to me. We used to have a much better Win2k/XP kernel compared to Win98/ME.But what happened to that? Security holes.

And we thought SP2 would put the security failures of WinXP behind. But what happend to that? More holes.

MS keeps screw up their OSes. All we have seen is FUD, manipulating, spinning and not treating their users with respect.

Check the record. MS is not to be trusted. With Linux, at least I don’t feel being forced into something I don’t want! That is called FREEDOM.–>

8. Green - April 25, 2007

Hi Sam! Photos i send on e-mail.
Green


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