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The destruction of Java November 14, 2006

Posted by rjdohnert in Opinions.
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Well Sun did it, they managed to destroy the future of Java.  The GPL release of Java was a huge mistake.  Why?  Because now there is no quality control over Java.  With the exception of Linux which is well tested, most other GPL products lack quality, tend to be buggy as hell and we will now have to deal with frequent, minor but sometimes damaging releases of the Java VM.  Not only that but I for one am not looking forward to the dozens of forks and VM’s that will appear because someones not happy with the path the Java community is taking.  Jonathan Schwartz and Sun do deserve some credit, they managed to kill the importance of the JCP and Sun Microsystems and they did manage to screw Microsoft out of two billion dollars and turn around and open the door for Microsoft to do what they were doing before and not have to pay another cent as now Patent protections are pretty much gone.

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Comments»

1. Mark N. - November 14, 2006

You are kidding, right? You know that the trademark “Java” is only available to distributions of Java that pass Sun’s tightly-controlled TCK?

If somebody forks Java, they’ll need to call it something else. Basically (as Tim Bray says), if it is called Java and has the Coffee Cup (TM), it’s real Java.

Now, explain to me again how we’ll get a whole bunch of Java forks…

2. Roberto J. Dohnert - November 14, 2006

” You are kidding, right? You know that the trademark “Java” is only available to distributions of Java that pass Sun’s tightly-controlled TCK? ”

Not anymore, when you GPL code like that guess what, you are unhindered in what you can do with it. Suns TCK is not worth a dime anymore. The GPLv2 strictly prohibits the TCK in its most basic format. ” 2. You may modify your copy or copies of the Program or any portion
of it, thus forming a work based on the Program, and copy and
distribute such modifications or work under the terms of Section 1
above, provided that you also meet all of these conditions:” There is basically no way for Suns quality control to survive

” If somebody forks Java, they’ll need to call it something else. Basically (as Tim Bray says), if it is called Java and has the Coffee Cup ™, it’s real Java.”

Actually the word Sun Java is trademarked by Sun, not Java. Its come that when reffering to the programming people tend to think of Suns Java but its actually not a trademark of Sun. If it is, you better call Starbucks, Caribou Coffee and a bunch of food distributors and inform them they are infringing on Suns trademark. The FreeBSD port of Java was actually called Java without being certified at the time. Apples port of Java for Mac OS X was not certified until 3 or 4 years after its release and was called Java. It only became official when Sun certified Apples JRE and JDK when Sun didnt want to create a specific “official” Sun Java for OS X

” Now, explain to me again how we’ll get a whole bunch of Java forks…”

someones not happy with the path the Java community is taking.

3. Erik - November 14, 2006

I’m happy that Java is now Open Sourced. This is bad for Mono though.

4. Ned - November 14, 2006

Sun reserves the right to sue anyone using the term Java:

http://www.tbray.org/ongoing/When/200x/2006/11/12/OSS-Java

5. Ned - November 14, 2006

I don’t think you are listening to the facts. Trademark law is separate from copyright law.

Here is Sun’s trademark policy, BTW, which is totally unaffected by the GPL:

http://www.sun.com/policies/trademarks/

C. Proper Descriptions of Non-Sun Products and Services

While a third party is not permitted to incorporate a Sun trademark into the name of its product or service, it can truthfully and fairly describe its products by referencing their relationship to Sun’s products and services. For example, to indicate that a third-party product is intended for use with Sun technology, a third party may use a descriptive phrase (sometimes called a “tagline”) that truthfully states this fact.

Example Set D»

A descriptive phrase using a Sun trademark must meet the following additional requirements:

1. Accuracy. The descriptive phrase must be accurate and not misleading.

2. Relationship to Sun. Sun trademarks may not be used in a manner that will cause potential confusion about the relationship between Sun and the third party product or service, for example, implying sponsorship or endorsement by Sun that does not in fact exist.

3. Compatibility or Conformance to Published Specification. Sun trademarks may not be used in a manner that improperly or inaccurately implies compatibility or conformance to any Sun specification or platform. However, if a third party product fully conforms to Sun’s published specifications for one of our technologies (for example, Java technology), the third party may use an appropriate descriptive phrase to reference or identify that fact.

4. Prominence. When using a descriptive phrase such as “for the Java platform” to indicate that the product is for use with Sun systems, the third party’s own product and company names must be displayed much more prominently than any Sun trademark referenced so that the source of the third party product is clear.

5. Proper Use of Symbols and Legends. Descriptive phrases should properly attribute the trademark with an appropriate symbol and legend as described in Usage Requirement I.D.

6. Do Not Attempt to Claim Rights in Sun Trademarks. Third parties may not state or suggest that they have, or are claiming rights, in any Sun trademark.


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